MobileBurn has an article that compares & contrasts the photographic capabilities of two relatively new 2 megapixel cameraphones : the Sony Ericsson K750 and the Nokia N90.

In a close call, the reviewer gives the edge to the Sony Ericsson K750. The cameras in these two phones were evaluated on the basis of sharpness, white balance, exposure, contrast, focus and low light performance.

The K750 won on the basis of its sharper lens … surprising in view of the N90’s much-vaunted Carl Zeiss optics and high price!!

Keypoints from The review :
Both are 2 megapixel units, both have auto focusing capability, and both have a history of cameras in the family (Sony’s digital cameras and Zeiss’ lenses). The K750’s camera has a slightly wider field of view, and seems to be a bit “faster” than the N90’s (meaning it needs less light) .The optical quality of the K750’s camera, which is much physically smaller than the N90’s camera, turned out to be superior in most every way. What the N90 did excel at, however, was taking photos that were generally more pleasing to the eye and less “digital” looking.
Sony Ericsson K750’s camera is capable of resolving finer detail than the Nokia N90 can. This means that small print is more readable, thin stripes stay visible, and subtle surface textures are more easily seen. You’ll also see that the K750 inflicts far less lens distortion on the photos it takes.But on the other side of the coin, you’ll see that the N90’s colors are warmer and more pleasant looking (if not always the most accurate). The N90 photos also have more color saturation, which makes them pop a bit more. Its exposure settings are, to my eyes, also closer to the ideal in more circumstances. On top of that, the N90 seems to be able to obtain focus more consistently.

So what we have is a case of the electronics company, Sony, coming up with a better lens, and the optics/phone company partnership, Zeiss and Nokia, coming up with better software and post-processing of the images. Exactly the opposite from what I was expecting.

Read the review by Michael Oryl (editor) at MobileBurn